Archive for the 'Turtle_Hill' Category

28
Mar
08

Bluebird at base of Turtle Hill – March 28, 2008

Bluebird at base of Turtle Hill, originally uploaded by Camp Naturalist.

Bluebird at the base of Turtle Hill in the sassafras trees.

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28
Mar
08

Snow Again – March 28 2008

We got a few inches of snow last night. I love snow but I’m ready for spring. It does look pretty though.

Here’s a dogwood.

Dogwood Bud - March 28 2008

Here an animal come out of Turtle Hill then decided to go back.

IMG_2654 - March 28 2008

Red Oak

Oak Leafs  - March 28 2008

09
May
07

Blanding’s Turtle on Hickory Trail Back of Shell – May 9 2007

Blanding’s Turtle on Hickory Trail Back of Shell, originally uploaded by Camp Naturalist.

I’m walking to work around 7:30am and I spy this blanding’s turtle on hickory trail. I believe blanding’s are a species of special concern here in Michigan.

06
May
07

Eastern Box Turtle – May 6 2007

Eastern Box Turtle, originally uploaded by Camp Naturalist.

I don’t usually find that many turtles on turtle hill, but this one is just calmly staying in place as I take a Sunday afternoon stroll. There’s so much pattern variation is turtle shells.

06
May
07

Decomposer Trio – Millipede Snail and Worm on Turtle Hill – May 6 2007

Decomposer Trio – Millipede Snail and Worm on Turtle Hill, originally uploaded by Camp Naturalist.

This trio of decomposers is under a sheet of shed elm tree bark locatedĀ on turtle hill. This is one of the largest millepedes that I’ve ever seen.

05
Apr
07

Waffer Ash Seed on Dirt April 5 2007

Waffer Ash Seed on Dirt April 5 2007Originally uploaded by Camp Naturalist.Here at the base of turtle hill(turtle hill map) I spy this wafer ash seed on some bare soil. I like how the ‘wafer’ seems to be dissolving away.

I’ve read that water ash fruit has beenĀ use as a hops substitute.

01
Apr
07

Mayapples(Mandrakes) on Turtle Hill – April 1 2007

IMG_8035, originally uploaded by Camp Naturalist.

Mayapples are starting to make their presence known to the forest again. They open up like umbrellas.

Mayapple’s scientific name Podophyllum peltatum, means “foot leaf” and “shield shaped”, which describes the leave shape quite well.

Well ripened fruits are edible by humans, having a lemony, banana like taste.

IMG_8036

Mayapples grow in colonies. Basically they are all clones connected through underground root systems. That is why you rarely see just one mayapple.